Stay tuned for instructional videos as well as gun and gear reviews.  In the meantime, check out the gun and gear suggestions below.  There are many excellent firearms available; the recommendations below are simply based on the experience of Dallas Carry instructor, Ty.

  • What gun do you suggest I buy?For most people, it can be difficult to find one handgun that serves all of your needs.  However, if you are in search of your first and only firearm you should strongly consider purchasing a handgun that excels at being carried.  For example, it would be better to own a Glock 42 and carry it every day versus owning a Glock 19 and only carrying it on the weekends because it's heavy and doesn't work with your work attire during the week.

  • Concealed Carry Guns: Carrying a firearm concealed generally means you're going to be carrying a pistol inside of your waistband in a holster.  As a result, the thickness of the firearm is one of the important factors in enabling you to comfortably wear the gun while still having it concealed.  A thicker gun may be uncomfortable or "print" causing your shirt or pants to bulge out, making it easier for people to notice your firearm.  Additionally, the grip length also plays a big part in being able to conceal a gun without the frame (grip) protruding from your side and again, causing "printing".  Ty (instructor) prefers the Glock 42 due to it's small size but excellent handling characteristics.  There are sub-compact firearms not on this list which are thicker and have greater capacity (ex: Glock 26, HK VP9SK, HK P2000SK) but the average person not looking to change how they dress, will likely find them too thick.

    • Glock 42​ (380acp)

    • Glock 43 (9mm)

    • Glock 43x & Glock 48 (9mm)

    • Smith & Wesson Shield (9mm or 45acp)

    • Walther PPS (9mm)

    • Springfield XDS (9mm or 45acp)

    • Sig P365 (9mm)

  • Pocket Carry Guns: The "concealed carry" guns listed above are generally large enough to shoot well, while still being light/thin enough to conceal on a consistent basis.  However, for those times that you simply can't conceal one of those pistols, it is convenient to have something small enough to fit into a pocket or smaller compartment on a purse.  It is still HIGHLY suggested and in my opinion, necessary to have a holster for these guns (sticky holster, remora, safariland locking holster, or custom kydex holster) to guard against accidental contact with the trigger.  These pistols are generally much harder to shoot, may have more recoil than a larger pistol, the sights will be harder to use, and they will have controls and triggers that are harder to manipulate.  Some may prefer the long, hard, deliberate trigger pull of these firearms to prevent unintended discharge should there be accidental contact with the trigger.

    • Smith & Wesson 380 Bodyguard with or without laser (380acp)

    • Ruger LCP (380acp)

    • Beretta Pico (380acp)

    • Glock 42 (380acp) - Note that the G42 is listed on concealed carry guns as well.  If you are large enough to have pockets which fit this gun (most people don't), you can carry it in a pocket (again, a holster is VERY necessary here even if it's in a pocket).

  • Standard/Duty Sized Guns: If you're looking for a handgun to keep as home defense or having fun at the range, size and weight are not as important.  Additionally, larger guns will accommodate the use of larger weapon mounted lights which is important for a self-defense handgun.  Some people will be able to conceal these handguns despite their larger size.  However, most average people will consider them too cumbersome to carry on a regular basis.

    • Smith & Wesson MP 2.0 (9mm - long slide, full length/standard, or compact)

    • Glock 19, Glock 19x, Glock 45, Glock 17, Glock 34 (9mm)

    • Springfield XD, XD Mod 2, or XDM (9mm - there are many variants/sizes)

    • CZ P01 or CZ SP-01

    • CZ P07 or CZ P09

    • CZ P10 or CZ P10c

    • HK VP9

    • HK P30 or P30L

    • HK P2000

    • Beretta 92a1 or Beretta 92a3

    • Sig P320 (9mm, multiple variants - beware, many early 320's were not drop-safe, meaning they could be fired if impacted like when a pistol is dropped)

    • Smith & Wesson MP 380 EZ (380acp - This is an excellent pistol for new shooters, those with reduced hand strength, or those with smaller hands)

  • 22LR Rimfire: Owning a .22LR pistol will help you develop your skills without spending as much on ammunition.  The are also great pistols for new shooters and those who are initially, recoil sensitive.  They are not advised for use as a self defense pistol due to the somewhat less reliable nature of the .22LR cartridge.  But, as a training pistol, a .22LR will help you become a better shooter and save money while doing it.

    • Smith & Wesson M&P 22 or 22 compact​

    • Taurus TX22

    • Ruger SR22

    • Ruger Mark IV

    • Browning Buckmark

  • Inside the waistband (IWB) holster brands: An IWB holster is generally used for concealed carry of a pistol.  There are MANY different brands, these are just a couple.

    • Stealthgear​ (Ty prefers the SG Revolution series of holsters)

    • Aliengear

  • Outside the waistband (OWB) holster brands: Unless your firearm requires a custom fit, the following brand will suit most shooters very well.  For common firearm types (ex: Glock) and lights (ex: Surefire or Streamlight), this brand will also accommodate weapon lights mounted on your pistol.

    • Safariland paddle holsters (Prefer ALS locking versions such as the 7ts series of holsters).​

    • Custom kydex holster (Kydex is a moldable plastic which LOTS of companies use to make holsters for almost any type of firearm, with or without accessories like lights.  There are too many options to list here)

  • "Sticky" holsters: These holsters are fabric pockets with a tacky exterior.  They are designed for carrying a firearm without the aid of clips or active retention (locking).  They are inexpensive and can be used to carry IWB.  Some people will use them to carry a pistol inside of a bag (ex: purse).  However this is only advised if you have a dedicated pocket for the gun/holster and you've ensured that you have proper retention on the firearm and that it is oriented in a manner that you can retrieve it safely.

    • Sticky holster

    • Remora holster

  • Weapon lights: If you have a firearm which can accommodate a weapon light, you should seriously consider purchasing one.  If given a choice of brightness/output (ex: Streamlight TLR-1), the version with the highest lumens would be preferable.  This will generally help you illuminate an area with brighter light and is better at blinding a potential intruder.

    • Streamlight TLR-6 (fits small guns like G42, G43, S&W Shield, etc)​

    • Streamlight TLR-7 (fits full sized guns but does not extend past the muzzle, ex: Glock 19)

    • Streamlight TLR-1 (full sized light)

    • Surefire x300u (version "a" is quick release, version "b" is screw mounted)

    • Olight PL-2

    • Olight PL-mini or PL-mini 2

  • Ear & Eye Protection

    • Howard Leight Impact Sport electronic earmuffs​ (To ensure adequate protection, these can and should be combined with earplugs in loud environments and/or for long periods of time)

    • Foam earplugs with high NRR (noise reduction rating - 32NRR is preferred)

    • Eye protection should be rated and marked as Z87.1 (impact resistant)

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